Psychology, MS - Advising

Welcome!  Arizona State University comprises sixteen colleges and schools spread across four campuses in the Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area. The MS program in psychology is offered by the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, which is part of the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, and is housed on ASU’s West Campus in Phoenix, AZ. 

We have a team of advisors and staff that are here to help you through your time in your program. Please email ncgradadvising@asu.edu with questions related to policies and procedures to help you navigate graduate school successfully. Many of the answers to your questions may be on this website and in the Handbook, please review both carefully.  

photo of Kristin Mickelson

Dr. Kristin Mickelson is the Program Director for the campus (ground) immersion MS in Psychology program at the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences. If you have any questions or concerns regarding the program, feel free to contact Dr. Mickelson at Kristin.Mickelson@asu.edu. 

 

If you are a continuing graduate student in one of our programs, you can setup an appointment with an advisor by clicking the “Make An Appointment” button below: 

Make an Appointment

If you are a new student, please click on the Next Steps Checklist button below to get started:

Next Steps Checklist

Welcome to Arizona State University's Master of Science program in Psychology. We have designed this program to give our students a strong, research-based foundation in the modern field of psychology. Our program emphasizes quantitative methodology, statistical analysis, professional development, and independent research. We further offer a variety of seminar courses on a wide range of psychology topics. The majority of our students' goals involve moving on to doctoral programs in psychology and related fields, and we have had great success with them attaining those goals. Many of our other students are looking for non-academic careers and have been extremely successful finding positions in government, education, behavioral health, and marketing. 

About the Program 

This is a two-year full-time program that requires 36 credit hours of research and coursework. A thesis is strongly recommended for students wishing to seek admission to a doctoral program. At the time of admission, students are matched with a faculty advisor who assists in designing the student's coursework and research activities. Our students receive training in advanced research methods and statistics, and can take elective seminar courses in several areas of psychology. 

We expect that all students will participate in faculty-guided research, and we require that all students take three credits of supervised research work each semester of their first year. This will provide all students with hands-on experience on experimental design, laboratory instrumentation, data collection and analysis, manuscript development, and grant proposal writing. We also encourage our students to attend major national psychological conventions to present research findings. 

Curriculum and Course Requirements 

Students in the MS program are admitted into one of two tracks: - Thesis Track: Students in the thesis track must complete 30 credits of coursework, 6 credits of Thesis research, pass a prospectus, and successfully propose and defend an original empirical research project that is acceptable to a committee of three supervising faculty. Applied Project Track: Students in the applied project track must complete 30 credits of coursework, 6 credits of Applied Project work, and produce a project (often a large paper or literature review) that is acceptable to a committee of two supervising faculty. No formal defense of the applied project is required. 

Students must specify a track at the time of application. Depending on faculty interest and the number of applications received, applicants may be offered admission into a different track than the one which they had indicated. Only with approval of advisors and the program director may students change tracks once they have begun the program. Additional information as to the specific curricular requirements can be found in the graduation checklists below.  

Graduation Checklist for Incoming Students (starting fall 2018 or after) 

Registration for Courses 

For information on steps to register, please visit the University’s Registrar’s Office Website: https://students.asu.edu/howtoregister.  

Questions 

If you have any questions about our Campus (Ground) Immersion MS Psychology program, feel free to contact ncgradadvising@asu.edu. 

Next Steps 

Please click on the Next Steps Checklist button below to get started:

Next Steps Checklist

Degree Requirements 

Required Courses (15 credits):  

  • Professional Issues in Psychology (3 credits) 

  • Research Methods (3 credits) 

  • Quantitative Analysis I (3 credits) 

  • Quantitative Analysis II (3 credits) 

  • Quantitative Analysis III (3 credits) - optional for Applied Project students 

Supervised Research PSY592 (3 credits each semester of 1st year, 6 credits total) 

Elective Courses (9 credits) 

Culminating Experience  

  • Thesis PSY599 (3 credits each semester of the second year, 6 credits total) 

OR 

  • Applied Project PSY593 (3 credits each semester of the 2nd year, 6 credits total) 

iPOS & Your Culminating Experience 

As a graduate student it is your responsibility to review the recommended course sequence the academic unit lays out for the students. If a student does not follow these recommendations it may delay time to degree completion. 

 Note: The below degree requirements are for those students admitted during the academic years of Fall 2018 through Summer 2021. For students admitted for Fall 2021, please see checklist in the Program Links box on the right side of this page.

Students will want to file their plan of study (iPOS) before the 50% mark of program completion. Students are encouraged to file earlier as the iPOS is easily adjusted. A guide to assist students in submitting their initial plan of study (iPOS) is available here 

To be eligible for the culminating experience, students must meet the following requirements:  

  • Up to date Plan of Study (iPOS) on file. 

  • Graduate GPA, Cumulative GPA, iPOS GPA must all be at 3.00. 

  • All core PSY courses MUST be completed prior to an enrollment override to the culminating experience. 

  • All statistics and methods courses MUST be completed prior to an enrollment override to the culminating experience. 

If you have any questions on the plan of study, please reach out to our advising team at ncgradadvising@asu.edu. 

RESEARCH CLUSTERS IN MS PSYCHOLOGY

RESILIENCE IN SOCIAL ENVIRONMENTS (RISE)

FACULTY IN THE RISE RESEARCH AREA HAVE A WIDE VARIETY OF INTERESTS INCLUDING INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS, CULTURE, STRESS, HEALTH, EMOTION, AND SOCIAL IDENTITY

ASU Mary Burleson

 

Mary Burleson

Research Interests: emotion, stress, touch, co-regulation, & autonomic psychophysiology.

 Dr. Burleson's research focuses on how emotion, stress, and physical contact (touch) can affect psychological and physiological functioning. Current studies include the contribution of emotion regulation processes to stress responses and the stress-reducing effects of physical contact. She specializes in teaching physiological psychology, biology of human sexuality, biological bases of behavior, and psychopharmacology.

 

Biosocial Psychology Lab

 

ASU Deborah Hall

 

Deborah Hall

Research Interests: social and group identity, social relations, social media

Dr. Hall's research examines how aspects of social and group identities shape people's thoughts, feelings, and behavior. Specifically, her work explores ways in which social identities tied to social class, political ideology, and religion influence perceptions of and interactions with others..A central theme across her core research areas is that a more nuanced understanding of the social and group bases of identity can pave the way for positive change through the development of research-based tools and interventions.

 

Identity & Social Relations Lab

  

 

photo of Kristin Mickelson


Kristin Mickelson

Research Interests: social relationships and health

 Dr. Mickelson's research is interdisciplinary, with special emphases on social and health psychology. Her research examines the role of stressors and psychosocial factors on relationship functioning and health. Specific areas of interest include how dimensions of stressors affect social support processes, as well as the role of socioeconomic status and gender on the stress-social support-health relationship. Her current research is focused on three questions: 1) gender differences in the risk and protective factors for postpartum distress in couples making the transition to parenthood; 2) the role of discrimination and resilience on race/ethnic differences in low birthweight; and 3) understanding the role of social media in coping and health. 

Social Relationships & Health Lab

 

ASU Nicole Roberts

 

Nicole Roberts

Research Interests: emotion, culture, couple relationships, psychophysiology, stress

 Dr. Roberts' research focuses on the study of emotion and on the cultural and biological forces that shape emotional responses. For example, how ethnicity and culture influence emotional displays and experiences; how the daily hassles of life, such as job stress and sleep deprivation, impact emotion regulation among individuals and couples; and how the emotion system breaks down in patients with psychopathology or neurological dysfunction. Dr. Roberts uses both observational and psychophysiological measures in her work.

  

Emotion, Culture, and Psychophsysiology Lab

 

ASU Lindsey Mean

 

Lindsey Mean (Affiliated Faculty from Communications) 

Research Interests: intersection of identities, sport, gender & sexuality, ideology & culture, discourses, language & representational practices across multiple sites and levels of enactment

 

 

Sport, Media, and Culture Lab

 

ASU Perla Vargas

 

Perla Vargas

Research Interests: health-related decision-making, health disparities

 Using a behavioral epidemiology framework, she studies behavioral processes involved in the management of oral health, asthma, food allergy, sleep, obesity, depression and suicidal behaviors; and is interested in identifying effective methods to improve the management of these conditions among high-risk, underserved populations. Dr. Vargas' work is widely published and has appeared in journals such as the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; and Behavioural Processes.

COGNITION, BEHAVIOR, & INFORMATION

FACULTY IN THE COGNITION, BEHAVIOR, & INFORMATINO GROUP AIM TO UNDERSTAND COGNITION USING MULTI-MODAL LABORATORY METHODS AND LARGE-SCALE, NATURALISTIC DATA. CURRENT RESEARCH INTERESTS INCLUDE ATTITUDE CHANGE, RISK-TAKING, PERSPECTIVE-TAKING, LANGUAGE PROCESSING, AND PERCEPTUAL LEARNING.

ASU Nick Duran

 

Nicholas Duran (also affiliated w/ RISE)

Research Interests: cognitive science, social perspective-taking, deception, collaborative problem solving

Dr. Duran studies complex cognitive processes as revealed in the dynamics of movement and language, both within  individuals and across dyads and groups. He uses a range of techniques such as computer-mouse tracking, motion capture, acoustic analysis, physiological sensing, nonlinear time series analyses, and discourse modeling.

  

Cognitive Dynamics & Communication Lab

  

 

Jose Nanez

Research Interests: cognitive neuroscience, bilingualism & cognition

Dr. Nanez conducts research in visual perceptual learning, neural plasticity/malleability, and cognition. He also studies cognitive processes in Spanish-English bilinguals. As Executive Director for Community Outreach, he creates and implements new strategies to enhance students' academic achievement and university life acculturation, with a strong emphasis on Hispanic, first-generation-university-going, and low SES students. 

 

ASU Derek Powell

 

Derek Powell

Research Interests: cognitive modeling, belief revision, intuitive theories, higher-order cognition

Dr. Powell studies higher-order cognition, such as reasoning and belief revision, using novel data and statistical methods. Before joining ASU, he spent time as a researcher at Stanford University and Facebook. 

 Cognitive Data Science Lab

  

PSYCHOLOGY AND LAW

FACULTY IN THE PSYCH AND LAW RESEARCH AREA HAVE INTERESTS IN BOTH LAW AND PSYCHOLOGY. CURRENT RESEARCH INTERESTS INCLUDE JURY DECISION MAKING, INTERGROUP DYNAMICS IN LEGAL CONTEXTS, HOW VARIOUS TYPES OF EVIDENCE INFLUENCE DECISION-MAKING, AND HUMAN REASONING.

asu-forensic-tess-neal

 

Tess Neal

Research Interests: human reasoning, inference, & decision making; clinical and legal judgments; expertise development 

Dr. Neal's program of research weaves together the clinical, cognitive, and social traditions of psychological science with philosophy, ethics, and law. She conducts research on the way people think and reach decisions, and what can go wrong resulting in poor judgments. She focuses especially on expert decision making in the legal system, such as by forensic mental health professionals, forensic scientists, and judges.

 

Clinical & Legal Judgment Lab

  

ASU Jessica Salerno

 

Jessica Salerno

Research Interests: emotion, intergroup dynamics, and legal decision-making

Dr. Salerno's research interests include several lines of inquiry that apply social psychological theory and experimentation to legal contexts. For example, the effect of emotion and intergroup dynamics in legal decision making, how moral outrage drives biases against stigmatized groups in ambiguous legal contexts, and how jurors evaluate the quality of scientific evidence presented by expert witnesses in court. 

Social Judgment, Decision Making, & Law Lab

 

ASU Nicholas Schweitzer

 

Nicholas Schweitzer

Research Interests: Legal decision making; mental disorders and punishment

Dr. Schweitzer's research focuses on the empirical study of the law and legal system, with a primary emphasis on how science is used by the judicial system. His lab studies focus on two particular areas: (1) How legal decision-makers use and understand scientific evidence, and (2) How advances in science and technology are affecting citizens' judgments of wrongdoers and legal authorities.

 

Law & Cognition Lab

 

ASU Laura Smalarz

 

Laura Smalarz

Research Interests: Eyewitness identification and testimony; perceptions of the wrongfully convicted; police interrogation and false confessions; social biases in the criminal justice system

Dr. Smalarz's research is primarily concerned with social factors that affect the reliability of eyewitness identification evidence. Her work investigates the conditions under which eyewitnesses make errors, tests methods for reducing those errors, and examines how eyewitnesses are evaluated by legal system players such as judges and jurors. 

 

Psychology & Law Lab

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