Tess Neal

Assistant Professor
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
3051

Biography

Tess M.S. Neal, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Psychology in ASU's School of Social and Behavioral Sciences (one of three schools in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences), where she directs the Clincial and Legal Judgment Lab. She is a founding faculty member of ASU's program on Law and Behavioral Science. She is a scientist, a licensed psychologist (State of Arizona #4630 and State of Nebraska #844 [voluntary inactive status in NE]), and a parent of two young children.

Her research is funded by multiple grants from the National Science Foundation, and she has published one edited book and more than three dozen peer-reviewed publications in such journals as Psychological Science in the Public InterestAmerican Psychologist; PLOS ONE; Psychology, Public Policy, and Law; and Criminal Justice and Behavior.  She is currently serving as associate editor of the Journal of Personality Assessment

She was named a 2016 "Rising Star" by the Association for Psychological Science (APS), a designation recognizing outstanding psychological scientists in the earliest stages of their research career post-PhD whose innovative work has already advanced the field and signals great potential for their continued contributions.  She received the 2016 Saleem Shah Award for Early Career Excellence in Psychology and Law, co-awarded by the American Psychology-Law Society (Div. 41 of APA) and the American Academy of Forensic Psychology. In 2020, she was awarded ASU's Outstanding Mentor Award.

Education

  • National Science Foundation Interdisciplinary Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. University of Nebraska (2013-2015) 
  • Clinical-Forensic Postdoctoral Residency - University of Massachusetts Medical School (2012-13)
  • Ph.D. Clinical Psychology; minors: Psychology-Law and Statistics, University of Alabama 2012  

 

Google Scholar

Research Interests

The central theme motivating our research is the desire to understand the way people think and reach decisions, as well as how to improve these processes to result in better outcomes for society.  We are especially interested in human judgment processes as they intersect with the law. We approach these questions with different methods, such as descriptive studies that yield foundational information about phenomena that precedes explanatory experimental work, experimental methods that can yield causal inferences, and integrative syntheses across methods and sources.  We study rich, real-world behaviors, embrace open science practices, and weave together theories and methods from the clinical, social, and cognitive traditions of psychological science.

Our work on these topics is organized by three overlapping categories: 

  • expert judgment, especially as it intersects with the law
  • lay judgment, especially as it intersects with the law
  • public policy implications of this work. 

Research Group

Clinical and Legal Judgment Lab: http://psych-law.lab.asu.edu/

ASU Program on Law and Behavioral Science: http://lawpsych.asu.edu/

 

Publications

Neal, T.M.S., Saks, M.J., Geisinger, K., Slobogin, C. & Faigman, D. (2019).  Psychological assessments in legal contexts: Are courts keeping “junk science” out of the courtroom?  Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 20(3), 135-164. doi: 10.1177/1529100619888860. 

MacLean, N., Neal, T.M.S., Morgan, R.D., & Murrie, D.C. (2019). Forensic clinicians’ understanding of bias. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 25(4), 323-330. doi: 10.1037/law0000212.

Neal, ​T.M.S. (2018). Forensic psychology and correctional psychology: Distinct but related subfields of psychological science and practice.  American Psychologist, 73, 651-662. doi: 10.1037/amp0000227

Neal, T.M.S. & Cramer, R.J. (2017).  Moral disengagement in legal judgments.  Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 14, 745-761. doi: 10.1111/jels.12163​

Neal, T.M.S. (2016). Are forensic experts already biased before adversarial legal parties hire them?  PLOS ONE., 11, e0154434. doi:10.1371/ journal.pone.0154434

Neal, T.M.S. & Brodsky, S.L. (2016). Forensic psychologists’ perceptions of bias and potential correction strategies in forensic mental health evaluations.  Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 22, 58-76. doi: 10.1037/law0000077.

Neal, T.M.S. & Grisso, T. (2014). Assessment practices and expert judgment methods in forensic psychology and psychiatry: An International Snapshot.  Criminal Justice & Behavior, 41, 1406-1421. doi:10.1177/0093854814548449.

Neal, T.M.S. & Grisso, T. (2014).  The cognitive underpinnings of bias in forensic mental health evaluations. Psychology, Public Policy, & Law, 20, 200-211. doi:10.1037/a0035824

Courses

Spring 2020
Course Number Course Title
PSY 399 Supervised Research
PSY 492 Honors Directed Study
PSY 493 Honors Thesis
PSY 499 Individualized Instruction
PSY 547 Correctional Psychology
PSY 592 Research
PSY 599 Thesis
Fall 2019
Course Number Course Title
PSY 399 Supervised Research
PSY 492 Honors Directed Study
PSY 493 Honors Thesis
PSY 499 Individualized Instruction
PSY 546 Advanced Forensic Psychology
PSY 592 Research
PSY 593 Applied Project
PSY 599 Thesis
PSY 792 Research
Spring 2019
Course Number Course Title
PSY 368 Forensic Psychology
PSY 399 Supervised Research
PSY 492 Honors Directed Study
PSY 493 Honors Thesis
PSY 499 Individualized Instruction
PSY 580 Practicum
PSY 592 Research
PSY 599 Thesis
Fall 2018
Course Number Course Title
PSY 399 Supervised Research
PSY 492 Honors Directed Study
PSY 493 Honors Thesis
PSY 499 Individualized Instruction
PSY 547 Correctional Psychology
PSY 592 Research
PSY 599 Thesis
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Title
PSY 474 Correctional Psychology
PSY 546 Advanced Forensic Psychology
PSY 592 Research
PSY 599 Thesis
Fall 2017
Course Number Course Title
PSY 399 Supervised Research
PSY 492 Honors Directed Study
PSY 493 Honors Thesis
PSY 499 Individualized Instruction
PSY 592 Research
PSY 599 Thesis
Spring 2017
Course Number Course Title
PSY 368 Forensic Psychology
PSY 492 Honors Directed Study
PSY 493 Honors Thesis
PSY 499 Individualized Instruction
PSY 592 Research
Fall 2016
Course Number Course Title
PSY 399 Supervised Research
PSY 492 Honors Directed Study
PSY 494 Special Topics
PSY 499 Individualized Instruction
PSY 592 Research
PSY 598 Special Topics
Spring 2016
Course Number Course Title
PSY 399 Supervised Research
PSY 494 Special Topics
PSY 499 Individualized Instruction
Fall 2015
Course Number Course Title
PSY 366 Abnormal Psychology
PSY 399 Supervised Research
PSY 499 Individualized Instruction