Karen Watanabe-Sailor

Associate Professor
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
2352

Biography

Karen Watanabe is an associate professor in the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences who develops mathematical models of biological systems to better understand and predict how chemicals in the environment cause adverse effects in living organisms. Prior to joining Arizona State University in 2016, she was a faculty member at Oregon Health & Science University where she taught a variety of graduate courses including Environmental Toxicology and Risk Assessment, and a seminar focused on scientific communication and presentation skills. She received her doctorate in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley where she majored in bioengineering and conducted research in collaboration with the School of Public Health to develop a model of benzene toxicokinetics in humans that accounted for measurement uncertainty and biological variability in the population.

Watanabe has received Scientific and Technological Achievement Awards from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for research related to modeling endocrine active chemicals and their effects upon reproduction in the context of ecological risk assessment. She has also participated in national and international workgroups focused on adverse outcome pathways and cancer risk assessment.

Education

  • Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering. University of California-Berkeley
  • M.S. Mechanical Engineering, University of California-Berkeley
  • B.S. Chemical Engineering (Biomedical Engineering), Northwestern University

Google Scholar

Research Interests

Dr. Watanabe develops computational models of biological systems. Her current research focuses on reproductive health both under normal conditions and in response to endocrine active chemicals.   This includes modeling early ovarian development in mice, and in fathead minnows modeling the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and oocyte growth dynamics.  As part of a National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) workgroup on Modeling Molecules to Organisms, she collaborated on the development of dynamic energy budget models in fish that will account for tradeoffs between growth and reproduction under food-limited conditions.   She is also actively engaged in developing quantitative adverse outcome pathway models for applications in predictive toxicology and risk assessment.

Learn more about Dr. Watanabes research at http://www.public.asu.edu/~kwatana6/index.html

Publications

For a current list of publications and research activity since joining ASU visit Experts.asu.edu

Courses

Spring 2020
Course Number Course Title
MAT 493 Honors Thesis
PTX 499 Individualized Instruction
MAT 499 Individualized Instruction
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Spring 2019
Course Number Course Title
MAT 210 Brief Calculus
MAT 451 Mathematical Modeling
PTX 499 Individualized Instruction
MAT 499 Individualized Instruction
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Summer 2018
Course Number Course Title
MAT 499 Individualized Instruction
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Title
MAT 275 Modern Differential Equations
MAT 451 Mathematical Modeling
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Fall 2017
Course Number Course Title
MAT 210 Brief Calculus
MAT 275 Modern Differential Equations
LSC 486 Peer Mentoring in Life Science
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Spring 2017
Course Number Course Title
MAT 210 Brief Calculus
MAT 451 Mathematical Modeling